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10-B Quilts: 19th through 20th Centuries
Guliya Shaykhutdinova

 

Guliua Shaykhutdinova

Teacher Name: Shaykhutdinova Guliya Tashtimirovna

Art Work: 10-B N/a Quilts: 19th through 20th Centuries

Theme: Creativity& Ingenuity

Lesson Plan Title: Quilts: Sharing a Common Language
A quilt will warm your body and comfort your soul Author Unknown

Subject areas: Visual Arts; American History African Americans; Civics; Math (Geometry)

Skills Covered:
Visual interpretation and analysis;
Recognition of colors, shapes, and patterns;
Comparing and contrasting ideas and images;
Graphic design;
Drawing conclusions from video sources

General Goals:

  • To enhance students knowledge of quilts as a cloth-based art form and how people of different cultures and time periods used quilts to pass down traditions and history.
  • To help students develop their English language skills by encouraging them to express their opinions and ideas about the artwork 10b Quilts: 19th through 20th Centuries.

Learning objectives:

  • At the end of the lesson students will be able to:
  • Explain what a quilt is; identify its elements (colors, shapes, patterns)
  • Understand how quilts and other cloth-based art forms are used to preserve family and community traditions
  • Describe American quilts of the 19th through 20th centuries
  • Define basic differences of traditional and modern quilt making
  • To allow students to productively use English through integrated skill activities.
  • To enrich students vocabulary by introducing and reinforcing quilt making related terms.
  • To enhance students speaking abilities through discussions.

Materials/ Visual Aids:
Teachers Resource Book Picturing America
Overhead projection for displaying video
Video or DVD disk with a movie Stepmom
Artwork 10b Quilts: 19th through 20th Centuries http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:_
9IJyOAsZxAJ:picturingamerica.neh.gov/
downloads/pdfs/Resource_Guide_Chapters/PictAmer_Resource_Book_Chapter_
10B.pdf+quilts:19+through+20+centuries&hl=en&gl=ru&pid=bl&srcid=
ADGEESjunlLIjF8Il-SFQo10glL62rOueXx7Z-YgGxkZlnum9Et_TxSfWvx0IA_WVCsyipxwEJyg_
oQINXjEBe1uTKBRhIa6RRwOy1lh1OcFvgsvuEZg4n9z006l2YCge-rfh46KGy9x&sig=AHIEtbTLcljeVXbaoPOT2ZS-dy7ghwtoEg

Printed copies of selected documents for student viewing
Glossary (Appendix A), Glossary of Quilt Terms (Appendix B), Activity worksheets (Appendices C, D, E), Assessment worksheet (Appendix F), Answer worksheet (Appendix G).
White construction paper, tissue paper, markers, crayons, rulers, paints for completing assessment worksheet and homework

Step-by-step procedures:
Lead-In (5 min.)
Have students watch an excerpt from the movie Stepmom. In one of the final scenes Mom who has an incurable disease gives a farewell present to her daughter.

    • Ask the class what present did Mom (Susan Sarandon) make for her daughter? Did she buy it in a shop? What scraps did Mom use for this quilt? What memorable family events did Mom depict in her work?
    • Encourage short discussion about quilts. Ask students if anyone has quilts at home and how they use them as blankets or as a wall hanging.

Activities:
Activity 1. Look and Think (15 min.)
Before starting observing tell students how a quilt is different from a blanket. If available, display an authentic quilt in the classroom to give students the opportunity to see how a quilt is constructed and what elements it has got. Explain students that a quilt is like two blankets (layers) sewn together with filling (or batting) in between.
The filling (batting) serves to give the quilt its warmth.
The top layer is decorated with patchwork
The bottom layer, called the liner, can be plain or decorated to make the quilt reversible.
All three layers are stitched (quilted) together.

Step 1. . Observing three quilts.
Provide students with Glossary of Quilt Terms (Appendix B).
Encourage students to look closely at quilts:
Quilt #1 - Hannah Greenlee and Emm Greenlee. Crazy Quilt, 1896.
Quilt #2 - Susan Noakes McCord. Grandmothers Fun quilt, c. 1900.
Quilt # 3 - Amish Quilts, 1920-1935
http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:_9IJyOAsZxAJ:picturingamerica.neh.gov/
downloads/pdfs/Resource_Guide_Chapters/PictAmer_Resource_Book_Chapter_10B.
pdf+quilts:19+through+20+centuries&hl=en&gl=ru&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjunlLIjF8Il-
SFQo10glL62rOueXx7Z-YgGxkZlnum9Et_TxSfWvx0IA_WVCsyipxwEJyg_
oQINXjEBe1uTKBRhIa6RRwOy1lh1OcFvgsvuEZg4n9z006l2YCge-rfh46KGy9x&sig=
AHIEtbTLcljeVXbaoPOT2ZS-dy7ghwtoEg

and answer the questions using the Glossary of Quilt Terms.

  • Ask students what shapes they can identify in each quilt.
  • Ask students what colors they can see in each quilt.
  • Ask students what patterns they can find in each quilt.

Step 2. Game (Appendix C). The purpose of this game to enhance students knowledge of verbs related to quilt making.

Step 3. Look and compare.
Encourage students to compare and contrast Quilts #1, #2, and #3.

  • What is the main difference between the patterns of these quilts?
  • How did quilts #1 and #2 create unity in their quilt designs?
  • Which quilt do you think took the most advance planning and why?
  • Which one do you think took the longest time to sew?
  • Which quilt has the border around the edge?

Step 4. Think and interpret.

  • Ask students why women made quilts.
  • Ask students why quilt makers often sewed bits scraps of fabrics together rather than using one large piece of material.
  • Ask students how quilts could record a familys story along with photography, videotapes, family trees, etc.
  • Think and guess what a diamond could symbolize on Amish quilts.

Activity 2. History of the three quilts (10 min.)
Reading for detail. Have students read the information about the historical background of all three quilts in the Teachers Resource Book Picturing America (pp.46-48) and complete worksheet (Appendix D). Ask students what diverse purposes quilts could serve in the past.

Activity 3. Quilts: the Past and the Present (8 min.)
Tell students about 19th century developments which made it easier for American women to make quilts: the invention of the cotton gin and power loom; opening of textile factories; the introduction of sewing machines.
Have students complete worksheet Quilts: the Past and the Present (Appendix E).

Closure (2 min.)
Have students go back to the initial Lead-in (the movie Stepmom) and ask them:

    • Why didnt Mom buy a quilt, but made it herself?
    • Why did Mom use the scraps of her daughters old dress?
    • How would you call this type of quilt?
    • On what occasion was the quilt made?
    • What memorable events from daughter life did Mom reflect on this quilt?
    • What elements of modern quilt making did you notice on this quilt?
    • Would you like to get or to make such a present for your loved ones?

Assessment (10 min.)
Worksheet Quilt 3 x 9 (Appendix F)

Extensions:

  • Assess students to search the Internet and find additional images of contemporary quilts. Have them describe one of the images.
  • Quilting is a very popular hobby nowadays, so there are quilting clubs and guilds practically in all communities. Have students interview a quilter about the process of making quilts; take pictures of her/his works; make a poster and put it on the display wall in the next lesson.
  • Have students collaborate on a story quilt based on some Russian well-known fairy tale. The students illustrations of a fairy tale can be assembled into a paper quilt. Hang the quilt in the classroom or school hallway. Challenge students of other classes to guess the name of the fairy tale.

Homework:

Creating the quilt E Pluribus Unum
There are two theories describing America's cultural diversity of population: the melting pot theory and the patchwork quilt theory.
Melting pot theory: immigrants of various nationalities are assimilated into one culture.
Patchwork quilt theory: ethnic groups maintain their cultural identity while forming a part of the main culture.
Challenge students to create a quilt E Pluribus Unum which means One from many (the USA national motto). This quilt reflects the patchwork quilt theory.
At home each student fills a square with drawings of American symbols (stars, stripes, eagle, etc.) and drawings of people belonging to different nationalities and ethnic groups of the USA. The size of a students square is defined by the teacher. Depending on the number of students in the class, each student can create more than one square.
Next lesson students paste their squares onto a large sheet of paper with spaces in between. The sheet of paper must be cut out in the form of the USA map. Students may add a border around the edge of the quilt. Display the quilt on the board.

List of References:

  1. Devlin, Joseph. Dictionary of Synonyms and Antonyms. : , 2002.
  2. Muller, V.K. Modern English-Russian Dictionary. Moscow: Russky Yazyk Publishers, 2001.
  3. Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary of Current English (Chief Editor Sally Wehmeier). Oxford: University Press, 7th Edition, 2005.
  4. Patton, Sharon, F. African-American Art (Oxford history of Art).
  5. Shaw, Robert. American Quilts: the Democratic Art, 1780-2007.

Selected Websites:

    1. Picturing America: http://picturingamerica.neh.gov/
    2. EDSITEment: http://edsitement.neh.gov
    3. www.wikipedia.com
    4. American Memory: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html
    5. Quilts and Quiltmaking in America 1978-1998: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/qlthtml/
    6. African American Quilting Traditions: http://xroads.virginia.edu/~ug97/quilt/atrads.html
    7. Smithsonian Museums: http://www.si.edu/museums/
    8. National Museum of African Art: http://www.nmafa.si.edu/index2.html
    9. National quilt Museum: http://www.quiltmuseum.org/
    10. Contemporary African Art Gallery: http://www..contemafricanart.com/

Appendix A
Glossary


#

Word, phrase

Translation

Definition

1.

Leisure n

,
~ activities/time/interests

Time when you are doing nothing, not studying or working
Doitatyour ~! , !
Idm. At ~
A gentleman/lady of ~ ,

2.

Stitch n, v

, ; , ; sl.

Syn. to sew
Proverb: A ~ in time saves nine , .
He has not a ~ to his back
Not a ~ of clothing
Idm. In ~s

3.

Motif n

,
a flower ~

Syn. a repeated pattern; theme

4.

Applique n

A needlework technique in which small pieces of fabric are sewn onto a larger piece

5.

Luxury adj


To live in ~

The enjoyment of expensive food, drinks, clothes, etc.
Syn. extravagance
Idm. In the lap of ~

6.

Thrifty adj

,

Spending money carefully
Syn. frugal

7.

Asymmetry n

Non equality in shape/size
Ant. symmetry

8.

Piece v

To put all parts together
Syn. to assemble

9.

Reversible adj

( );
A ~ jacket/cap/scarf

A cloth/material that can be used with both sides showing
Ant. irreversible

10.

Wedge n

, -
A ~ of cake

A piece of wood/metal, etc. with one thick and one pointed ends
Idm. Todrivea ~ -, -

11.

Tremor n

,
A ~ in voice

A slight shaking movement
Syn. quiver

12.

Reminiscent adj

,

Reminding you of sb/sth

13.

Grandeur n

, ,

Something great and impressive
Syn. Splendor
Ant.Simplicity

14.

Quiver n

See #11

 

15.

Bee n

,

Meeting of people for collective work
Idm. The bees knees=cream of society
Idm. To have a ~in your bonnet (about sth)=be crazy about sth

Proper Names: Geographical Names:
Hannah and Pharoah McDowell County, North Carolina
John and Rebecca Logan Historic Carson House
Margaret Ruth Ghana
Thomas young Greenlee the Ivory Coast
Emm Waltham, Massachusetts
Susan Noakes McCord McCordsville, Indiana
Menno Simons Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Jacob Ammann
William Penn

Appendix B
Glossary of Quilt Terms

  1. Shapes:

Circle, oval, square, triangle, rectangle, parallelogram, rhombus, pentagon, hexagon, heptagon, octagon.

  1. Colors:

Red, orange, yellow, gold, silver, purple, pink, black, brown, grey-and-white, dark brown, deep navy, light blue, rich green, solid, etc.

  1. Patterns:

Elements repeated in the design of a quilt, e.g. hearts, diamonds, stars, baskets, butterflies, angels, wreaths, vines, leaves, flowers, animals, fish, frogs, etc.

  1. Layers of the quilt:
  1. Top -- the "front," of a quilt, which is usually intended to be seen
  2. Lining (Backing) - a piece of cloth that makes the back of the quilt
  3. Filler (Padding, wadding) -- the middle layer of a quilt which makes a quilt warm and puffy.
  1. Fabrics (textiles, materials):

Cotton, domestic, muslin, satin, silk, velvet, wool, kente, synthetic, homespun, purchased, luxury, etc.

  1. Techniques:
  1. Applique - a needlework technique in which a piece of one fabric is sewn on top of another larger piece of fabric.
  2. Crazy -- a patchwork technique in which irregular pieces of fabric are stitched to form a quilt block. Crazy quilts may be decorated with embroidery.
  3. Contained Crazy a crazy quilt with separate squares combined in a grid which adds a degree of order to the chaos.
  4. Fan -- a quilting design of repeated concentric arcs that forms an all-over stitching design usually unrelated to the design of the quilt top. It was popular during the late 19th early 20th centuries; it is considered to be old-fashioned and undesirable in modern quilt making.
  5. Fancy quilting -- the process of making quilts in which the decorative function is more

important than their use as warm bedcovers.

  1. Piecing -- a needlework technique in which two pieces of cloth are joined together with a seam.
  2. Strip -- a construction technique in which long, narrow pieces of fabric are joined lengthwise, sometimes with long rows of quilt blocks, to form a quilt top.
  3. Tacking -- tying the layers of a thick quilt together with yarn knots instead of quilting.
  1. Types of quilts:
  1. Amish Quilt - a quilt made by or in the style of the Amish quilters of Pennsylvania or the Midwest (often Ohio or Indiana). Amish quilts are made of fine wool, with thin layer of filler; the fabrics are unprinted, often in deep and rich jewel tones with much black and deep navy. Central medallion square-in-a-square with wide borders is a popular design.
  2. Charm quilt a quilt made from tiny pieces of fabric of a single shape (square, triangle, etc.)  
  3. Memory quilt a quilt made from a loved one's clothing ( from outgrown baby clothes, jeans, ties, T-shirts, uniforms, dresses, etc) or other special fabrics with printed photos and documents holding special memories for the user. Such quilts are made to commemorate some special occasions as a birthday, new baby, graduation, wedding, anniversary, retirement, etc.
  4. Scrap quilt a quilt made up of many different fabrics left over from other projects or usable remnants of clothing.  
  5. Signature quilt - a quilt in which individuals can leave their signatures or some memorable messages using washable marking pens.
  6. Water color quilt - a quilt made up of many small squares sewn to give an overall impression of the painting of the Impressionists.
  7. Whole-cloth quilts - a quilt made from one large piece of fabric without pieced blocks in it.

8. Some other Quilt Terms:
Block - one unit of patchwork design, usually in the form of a square, which is repeated and combined in rows to form a quilt top.
Comforter a thick, heavy quilt, designed to provide warmth.
Cutaways - remnants from apparel factories, usually forming irregular shapes. Factories sometimes sell cutaways to quilt makers, often by mail order.
Frolics (quilting bees) a gathering of women where they talk, gossip and work in group on a quilt.
Kente a traditional fabric assembled from hand-woven strips made in Ghana and the Ivory Coast. It is traditionally a ceremonial cloth. Many printed versions of kente on cotton now exist and are popular with quilters.
Patchwork -the process of sewing fabric pieces to make the colorful quilt top.
Quilt - a textile bedcover typically formed of three layers: a decorated top, a plain backing, and a fluffy filling between them. The layers of a quilt are usually sewn together with stitches through all the layers; alternatively, they may be tied or "tacked" together with yarn knots.
Quilting - a needlework process in which layers of a quilt are attached to each other with continuous stitches, either by hand or with a sewing machine.
Wall hanging - a quilt, usually smaller in size than a bed quilt, designed to be displayed vertically as a decorative element.

Appendix C
Game
Overview: The purpose of this activity is to enhance your knowledge of verbs related to quilt making.
Directions: A leader thinks of an action connected with the theme and mimes it in front of the class. Students try to guess what he/she is doing and ask him/her a question in the Present Continuous Tense. A leader gives a short and a full answer. If a student guesses, he becomes a leader.
Suggested actions: cutting, sewing, stitching, patching, piecing, and weaving.
Student 1: Are you cutting something?
Leader: No, Im not. Im not cutting.
Student 2: Are you weaving something?
Leader: No, I am not. Im not weaving.
Student 3: Are you stitching something?
Leader: Yes, I am. Im stitching.
Change of a leader.

Appendix D
Student name _________ Date _______

True - False Activity
Overview: The purpose of this activity is 1. To assess students comprehension of the text Quilts: 19th through 20th Centuries (Teachers Resource Book, pp.46-48). 2. To practice persuasive speaking.
Directions: 1. Mark the statements 1-8 T (true) or F(false);

  1. Hannah and Pharoah, age twelve, were given as a wedding present by John and Rebecca Logan to their daughter Margaret Ruth.
  2. Crazy Quilt was begun by Hannah Greenlee and finished by her niece Emm in 1896.
  3. The work Hannah Greenlee performed as a house servant was raising vegetables and chickens.
  4. Susan Noakes Mc Cord was a farmwife who lived in Indiana.
  5. She had six children and still found time between housework to make quilts.
  6. In 1730s the Amish founded their first communities in Pennsylvania.
  7. The Amish welcomed the Industrial Revolution and the development of the technology.

1

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8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. In the Amish community men and women preferred bright colors in clothing.
  1. Get into three teams. Each team writes a convincing description about the quilt including some biographical information about the author. Each team presents its quilt to the class and tries to convince the classmates to buy the quilt. Useful phrases:

This quilt is fantastic, amazing, a masterpiece
The colors in this quilt are rich, unusual, attractive, bright
The patterns in this quilt are fantastic, interesting, special
The elements in this quilt are wonderful, great, unique
The author(s) of the quilt has (have) expressed
You cannot live without this quilt
Just imagine this quilt hanging on your wall
Dont miss the opportunity to buy this quilt!
When your friends (neighbors, relatives) see this quilt in your house they will die of envy!

Appendix E
Student name _______________ Date _____

Worksheet Quilts: the Past and the Present
Overview: The purpose of this activity is 1. To help you understand the difference between old traditional quilt making and modern quilt making. 2. To enhance your public speaking skills.
Directions: 1. Read the sentence and define whether it refers to old, traditional quilt making or to the contemporary revival of quilt making. Fill in the table with letters T (traditional) or M (modern).

  • Quilting is a hobby, a kind of leisure activity.
  • Quilt making is practiced primarily as an individual or local activity by older women.
  • Catalogs, books and magazines provide a wealth of new patterns and techniques.
  • Quilt makers participate in national exhibitions and contests.
  • Quilts are made from available fabrics, materials on hand, and remnants from home sewing.
  • Quilts are made primarily out of necessity, for warmth.
  • Non-symmetrical design, detailed pictorial images, computer-generated and photo-transfer images are used by the quilt makers.
  • Quilts exist in a private sphere, inside the home, within families.
  • Quilts are used as blankets and bedcovers.
  • Fabrics are designed especially for quilters.
  • Quilts are made to decorate a wall, compete in a contest or serve as a gift.
  • Young women and some men from urban backgrounds took up quilting.
  • Quilt makers learn to make quilts from older relatives and friends.
  • Quilts are pieced without patterns using strips and rectangles.

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  1. Get into two teams: Team T supports traditional quilt making, Team M supports modern quilt making. Team members sit/stand opposite each other. One of the teams starts the debate offering one argument in defense of traditional/modern quilt making. His opponent from the second team offers counterarguments on this particular point. Each student gives at least one argument or counterargument. At the end of the debate the final speaker (or a teacher) provides the closing remarks.

Appendix F
Student name __________ Date _____

Assessment Worksheet Quilt 3x9
Overview: The purpose of this activity is to assess students knowledge of the whole theme.
Directions: 1. Quilt blanket 3x9

    1. Make a drawing of a quilt blanket, divide it into 9 blocks (squares)
    2. Paint each block different colors.
    3. Fill each block of the quilt with three appropriate words or phrases:

3 colors
3 shapes
3 fabrics
3 techniques
3 quilt layers
3 types of quilts
3 patterns
3 proper names
3 states
Note: In the blocks 3 proper names and 3 states write down the names and the states you read in the Teachers Resource Book (pp. 46-48).

2. Give a short written description of any of the quilts you learned at the lesson:

    1. Crazy quilt by Hannah and Emm Greenlee
    2. Grandmothers Fun quilt by Susan Noakes McCord
    3. Any of the six Amish quilts

Appendix G

Answer Sheet


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

T

F

F

T

F

T

F

F

True - False Activity (Appendix D)

Quilts: the Past and the Present (Appendix E)


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

M

T

M

M

T

T

M

T

T

M

M

M

T

T

 
         
ELO     RMM